MoosilaukeBooks.com

The Books of the Moosilauke History Series

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Individual Books of The Moosilauke History Series

NOTE: I have set aside books to make up the Moosilauke collections — a limited number of books are also available individually (below), on a first-come first-serve basis:

Shipping for individual books:
$5 for first book (USPS Media mail); free shipping for two or more books.
Book 1 – $20
A Mix of Years
William S. Morse
Book 2 – $20
The Moosilaukee Reader Vol. 1
Robert W. Averill
Book 3 – $20
The Moosilaukee Reader Vol. 2
Robert W. Averill
Book 4 – $20
Up Moosilauke
Jack Noon
Book 5 – $75
In Search of Amos Clough
Robert W. Averill
Book 6 – $35
Daniel Clement’s Moosilauke Journal
Robert W. Averill
Book 7 – $40
Mt. Moosilauke Tip Top News
Robert W. Averill
Book 8 – $20
The Moosilaukee Reader Vol. 3 Along the Trail with the Pemi Kid
Robert W. Averill
Book 9 – $20
Rambles Through New Hampshire: Early & Late
Jack Noon
Book 10 – $10
A Country Life
William S. Morse
Book 11
The Moosilaukee Reader Vol. 4
Robert W. Averill

To order either set, contact rwaverill@gmail.com with your preferred shipping address and the collection you wish to receive. Orders payable by check to Robert W. Averill, 73 Zerah Fiske Road, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370

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Discover Book 10 of the Moosilauke History Project

A Country Life

Stories of country life in the early part of the century—the way it really was—horses, cider, one-room schools, privies, lubmerjacks, Prohibition, and more.

If a rural New Englander lives long enough—I’d say 75 is the minimum acceptable, and 80 or 90 is better—he or she gets to be an old timer. Bill Morse is a different kind of old timer.

To order your personal copy of A Country Life, contact Robert Averill at rwaverill@gmail.com Include your preferred shipping address. Orders payable by check to Robert W. Averill, 73 Zerah Fiske Road, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370
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Discover Book 9 of the Moosilauke History Project

Rambles Through New Hampshire: Early & Late

Ten rambles into New Hampshire’s past, half of them from lengthy
researches into historical forests, fish, wildlife, and a northcountry
native American of two centuries ago. The other rambles from before
gas powered vehicles were common touch on town team baseball,
climbing Mount Washington in winter, settlers who carried sacks
of grain over to the gristmill at Daniel Webster’s birthplace, and
a 14-year-old’s 160 mile solo hike back in 1825. One more recent
ramble is a Fourth of July climb of Mount Moosilauke to witness
the nation’s bicentennial sunrise and to celebrate the sun’s most
appropriate appearance directly behind Mount Washington.

To order your personal copy of Rambles Through New Hampshire: Early & Late, contact Robert Averill at rwaverill@gmail.com Include your preferred shipping address. Orders payable by check to Robert W. Averill, 73 Zerah Fiske Road, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370
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Discover Book 8 of the Moosilauke History Project

Moosilauke! Along the Trail with the Pemi Kid

(Moosilaukee Reader Vol. 3)

Explore the ties between two “camps” — Camp Pemigewassett, an enduring boys’ camp in Wentworth, New Hampshire begun in 1908, and the Moosilauke Summit Camp a few miles to the northeast. Beginning in 1910, in the days of the Moosilauke “Tip Top House,” and ending in 1942 after the loss of the Dartmouth Outing Club’s “Summit Camp” in a fire during a fall storm. Weekly trip reports by campers and staff were created for the camp newsletter — Bean Soup— as well as original artwork here and in the Moosilauke summit logbooks. 

These are joined with the additional memories of former campers, all “Pemigewassett Kids.”  In their own way, these accounts are unique. Those who have had the good luck to have spent their early years as a camper or counselor or working on a high mountain peak will enjoy these long-ago stories.

To order your personal copy of Moosikauke! Along the Trail with the Pemi Kid, contact Robert Averill at rwaverill@gmail.com 
Include your preferred shipping address. Orders payable by check to Robert W. Averill, 73 Zerah Fiske Road, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370
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Discover Book 7 of the Moosilauke History Project

Mt. Moosilauke Tip Top News 1880–1916

by Robert W. Averill

$40.00  •  416 pages
A variety of visitors sought out the summit of this high-mountain peak in the White Mountains of New Hampshire: teachers and college professors; ministers and scientists; writers, reporters, and poets; city-tired families from afar. Many wrote about their experiences with mountain weather, the challenges of ascending to the peak of a bare-topped mountain nearly 5000 feet above sea level, their encounters with fellow-pilgrims on the mountain and at the summit house.
These essays had been sent to newspapers and magazines, even beyond New England. They entertained readers a century before our modern electronic age. More than 250 illustrations — engravings, period maps, photos — bring these essays into even clearer focus.
“Those years leading up to the First World War marked the end of an era. It was a time mostly of local horse-drawn transportation rather than the automobile, of news dependent on newspapers before radio broadcasts became common in the 1920s, and of rural areas except in a few localized spots doing without electricity. Peace and tranquility prevailed atop the mountain, encouraging deep thoughts and long perspectives. Visitors at the Tip Top House merely by stepping outdoors could witness sunrises, sunsets, and starlit nights or they could stay warm and dry inside and view summer storms. Days of leisure were given to exploring obscure points of interest on the mountain. Writers of prose and poetry found ample inspirations and visited the summit often.”
Jack Noon, from his Introduction

To order your personal copy of Mt. Moosilauke Tip Top News, contact Robert Averill at rwaverill@gmail.com

Include your preferred shipping address. Orders payable by check to Robert W. Averill, 73 Zerah Fiske Road, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370

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Discover Book 6 of the Moosilauke History Project

Daniel Clement's Moosilauke Journal - 1879

by Robert W. Averill

$35.00

In 1879 a New Hampshire man named Daniel Clement decided to set down his experiences on the top of Mt. Moosilauke, one of the few high White Mountain peaks with a summit house. With him was his older brother, James, the original builder of the Prospect House. Together they explored the wildlife, forests, and geology of the mountain, observed a full year of seasons and storms, “washed the delf” and debated all of life’s intricacies — from the challenges of life above treeline to death and the hereafter.

“Once a man comes from Mt. Blue by Deer lake to our inn. He has a fish pail on his back and ten trout in it that tip ten pounds. He says he caught them from a small pond far in the notch north of Mt. Blue. I am the first man who ever saw that pond says he, and no one else knows where it is. Jim says no doubt but that he tells the truth, but Mrs. Jim thinks he got them out of some man’s fish pond without leave. Mrs. Jim cooks the trout and we all have a good meal. How glad we are he found that bright pond in the woods. We hope he will find it next month and come back once more at least.”
– Moosilauke Journal — 1879 
To order your personal copy of Daniel Clement’s Moosilauke Journal, contact Robert Averill at rwaverill@gmail.com Include your preferred shipping address. Orders payable by check to Robert W. Averill, 73 Zerah Fiske Road, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370
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Watch Robert's Interview on the Release of In Search Amos Clough:

Discover Book 5 of the Moosilauke History Project

In Search of Amos Clough

by Robert W. Averill

$75.00
Who was this pioneering photographer of the White Mountains, his story almost lost to obscurity, that sought out “gems” from the natural world? Explore the dawn of photography and the life of a New Hampshire explorer in this masterful 370 page hardcover that collects over 150 full-sized viewable 3-D stereoscopic photographs – the most spectacular of which come from the 1870 winter expeditions atop Mount Moosilauke and 1871 expedition on Mount Washington.  
“An ardent lover of nature, his great powers of endurance enabled him to secure the rarer scenes of the mountains and valleys in summer and winter, which were ungathered by those of feebler body or less indomitable perseverence.”
– The Philadelphia Photographer, Jan. 1873
  • 150 high-resolution, full-sized stereoviews, plus 140 photographs, maps, and engravings.
  • Selected images by Amos Clough’s New Hampshire partners: Howard A. Kimball of Concord; Charles F. Bracy of Warren; Charles B. Cheney of Orford.
  • Detailed Notes section (Appendix).

3-D Stereoviewer and Instructions Included!

To order any Moosilauke book, contact Robert Averill at rwaverill@gmail.com for shipping info and details.

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Discover Book 6 of the Moosilauke History Project

Daniel Clement's Moosilauke Journal - 1879

by Robert W. Averill

$35.00

In 1879 a New Hampshire man named Daniel Clement decided to set down his experiences on the top of Mt. Moosilauke, one of the few high White Mountain peaks with a summit house. With him was his older brother, James, the original builder of the Prospect House. Together they explored the wildlife, forests, and geology of the mountain, observed a full year of seasons and storms, “washed the delf” and debated all of life’s intricacies — from the challenges of life above treeline to death and the hereafter.

“Once a man comes from Mt. Blue by Deer lake to our inn. He has a fish pail on his back and ten trout in it that tip ten pounds. He says he caught them from a small pond far in the notch north of Mt. Blue. I am the first man who ever saw that pond says he, and no one else knows where it is. Jim says no doubt but that he tells the truth, but Mrs. Jim thinks he got them out of some man’s fish pond without leave. Mrs. Jim cooks the trout and we all have a good meal. How glad we are he found that bright pond in the woods. We hope he will find it next month and come back once more at least.”
– Moosilauke Journal — 1879 

For information about the Moosilauke History Series, questions about book pricing and availability, and how to get your own copy, simply send me an email at rwaverill@gmail.com

Limited availability of the early books #1-4, which are out-of-print and uncirculated. These are reserved for those who are putting together complete sets of the Series — email me at rwaverill@gmail.com for inquiries on these books. Other sources: a few books in the Series may be found at online sites like ABE.com or eBay, or at Steve Smith’s Mountain Wanderer Bookstore in Lincoln, NH.

Book 4 of the Moosilauke History Project

Up Moosilauke

by Jack Noon (2000); 213 pages; illustrated
 
Eight historically-based short stories by Jack Noon, providing glimpses of a forgotten past; among them cutting the first Moosilauke trail (1840); opening the summit’s Prospect House (1860); the gold craze (1875); mountain poet Lucy Larcom (1892); skiing Hell’s Highway (1942). Also one of the Barston-Wheelock series by Jack Noon.
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Books 2 and 3 of the Moosilauke History Project

The Moosilaukee Reader (Volumes 1 and 2)

by Robert W. Averill (1999); 613 pages; illustrated
Foreword by Jack Noon
 
A core collection of stories written over the last two centuries centered on Mt. Moosilauke.This is a broad sampler of Moosilauke’s literature, written by scientists and historians, journalists, measurers and recorders, naturalists, essayists, travelers, adventurers, and others. 

“…a rare find.” — M. J. Beagle

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Book 1 of the Moosilauke History Project

A Mix of Years

by William S. Morse (1998); 223 pages; 150+ illustrations and maps
Introductions by Jere Daniell, Paul Doherty, Will Lange, and Stearns Morse
 
The autobiography of Bill Morse, including his years on the summit of Mt. Moosilauke from 1915-1917, as well as his accounts of life in and around the mountains and forests of northern New England in the early 20th century.  

“A true Yankee will never discuss what it means to be one. But if you listen to his stories, you’ll know.”   — Willem Lange

For information about the Moosilauke History Series, questions about book pricing and availability, and how to get your own copy, simply send me an email at rwaverill@gmail.com